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How To Craft The Perfect New Year

How to Craft the Perfect New Year

As 2021 draws to a close, many traditions will be followed in marking the end of the year and the beginning of the new. In Italy, festivities during this period are often celebrated with a glass or two of Franciacorta or Prosecco. We decided to head north to find out about these two festive wines.

Origins

Wine cellar, Franciacorta

Franciacorta, the town in the Lombardy region of northern Italy has been producing wine since before the Roman period. Ancient vines and other fascinating signs of viticulture have been uncovered by archaeological excavations in the area. Evidence suggests that the Gauls, Romans, and Lombards all felt a connection to the territory. The geographical area specified as part of the official Denominazione di origine controllata (DOC) of Franciacorta dates back to 1429, when Franciacorta was part of the territory of the Venetian Doge Francesco Foscari.

Winery, Franciacorta

The production of sparkling wine in this area dates back to the 16th century, although the Franciacorta sparkling wine we know today wasn’t granted official (DOC) status until 1967. Production really took off in the 1980’s and in turn sales of Franciacorta rocketed. The superior quality DOCG status (Denominazione di origine controllata e garantita) wasn’t granted until the 1990s, cementing Fraciacorta as a world-renowned high quality sparkling wine.

Prosecco sparkling wine heralds from the Veneto and Friuli Venezia Giulia regions, with the name thought to originate from the village Prosecco in the Trieste province. As with Franciacorta, wine production in this area predates the ancient Roman period. Unlike Franciacorta, the second fermentation of Prosecco takes place in stainless steel tanks and there are many variations of Prosecco; whether that be the lesser known tranquilo (non-sparkling), frizzante or spumante.

Vineyards, Valdobbiadene

The two DOCG superior quality Prosecco spumante wines come from areas between the hills of towns in the region. The first being the Asolo Prosecco Superiore DOCG, and the second the more well-known Conegliano Valdobbiadene Prosecco Superiore DOCG. Often abbreviated to Valdobbiandene Prosecco by the English speaking market, this superior quality prosecco heralds from the hills between the two towns of Conegliano and Valdobbiadene. This stunning area has since been designated a UNESCO World Heritage site and is well worth a visit.

Take a Sip…

Prosecco tasting, Conegliano Valdobbiadene

On our quest to sample the best prosecco (someone’s got to do it!) and meet the most impressive artisans, we managed to find a beautiful winery located in Valdobbiadene hills. If you want to hear first-hand the techniques and history of Prosecco Valdobbiadene we suggest a visit to Cima Farm. The team here have been producing the famous prosecco since the 1960s. Not only can you visit the vines and speak to expert artisans, it is possible to stay in the beautiful surroundings and eat incredible local produce coupled with of course, a glass of the world famous Conegliano Valdobbiadene Prosecco Superiore!

Tasting, Franciacorta

In Franciacorta we recommend a visit to Berlucchi Franciacorta. Visitors can enjoy a guided tour of the Palazzo Lana, which houses a historic cellar dating back to 1680, although it wasn’t until 1961 that the famous Franciacorta was first successfully produced here. A highlight is obviously a tour of the all important vineyards. Taking into consideration sustainability, the focus is on producing quality, not quantity. Learn all about the innovations at this winery – how the land, grape and new technology are harnessed by artisan oenologists.

Toast to the new year with Creative Italy

Photo credit – Cottonbro, Pexels

If you want to get into the festive spirit and visit one of our handpicked historic or innovative cellars, let us tempt you with a Franciacorta or Prosecco tasting. You will meet artisan winemakers who have embraced the initiative to preserve this unique art.

• Minimum 2 pax
• Duration: 5 hours or more
• Where: Asolo, Franciacorta, Valdobbiadene
• When: Throughout the year
• Depending on the season and the region of choice, the experience may be combined with a seasonal activity such as the olive harvest; the search for truffles; and fruit picking

What better way to ring in the new year than to book your experience with Creative Italy? Contact us now and we’ll help you toast to 2022!

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